Caring for seniors in their homes is becoming a very popular business; and one that is expected to grow as more and more people continue to age. But how do you find a good Home Care agency? Having owned and operated Wake County’s oldest Home Care agency, and being a certified trainer for the State of North Carolina’s DHSR, we know a little bit about what differentiates a good Home Care agency from a bad one. 1) Don’t just make sure they have insurance, ask for a copy of it! Every business owner in America can and should have a copy of a Certificate of Insurance. It details what insurance they have bought for a given period of time. Insurance a Home Care agency should carry is: Professional and General Liability, Workers Compensation, Theft or Bonding, and Hired and Non-Owned Auto. 2) How long has the agency been in business? Believe it or not, we’re still running across new things after 12 years of helping seniors. Nothing can replace experience! As an example, the longer an agency has been in business, the more established and trusted staff they have. They’ve weeded out the employees that “no call/no show” for a case, and are in a position to send out only trusted employees. 3) Does the owner of the agency give you their mobile number? Since we provide care to seniors 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days out of the year, my employees and clients may need to contact either myself or my Director of Nursing at anytime. Do they answer it? Test it a couple of times at various hours of the day, and see what happens. If you leave them a message and they don’t call you back; that’s very indicative of the type of service you’ll receive from them in the future. 4) You get what you pay for! Believe it or not, we are not getting rich charging our clients $20/hr. for services we provide. The margins in this line of work simply are not there. And we run a VERY lean agency. So, when someone says that they’ll only charge you $14 an hour versus our $20, you’re going to get what you pay for in service and in the employee they send to you. 5) Ask for referrals. We are MORE than happy to give both existing clients as well as previous clients that will vouch for both our employees that provide care as well as our commitment to customer satisfaction. The mere fact that the agency is willing to hand of references for you to call says a great deal about their agency; follow up and call those references! 6) How many clients do they have? Believe it or not, bigger is not always better. We’re a boutique agency; we only serve 30-40 clients at any one given time. Why, because it allows us to get to know each of our clients, their families, and their needs. I also know each employee that I am scheduling with the client. When it comes to Home Care, smaller really is better! 7) Who does the scheduling at the agency? While I hate to make blanket statement, I will say that “schedulers” and business owners have different priority sets. Having employed schedulers in the past, if the scheduler couldn’t find a fill in for a sick caregiver, they still received their paycheck all the same. In other words, if a scheduler couldn’t fill a shift, it was no skin off their nose. At Helping Hands of America, I do the scheduling. Raleigh is a small town, and I have a vested interest in making sure that my employees are there, day in day out. I can’t afford to have my professional or personal reputation smeared due to an employee dropping the ball. 8) Does the Home Care agency use a telephone log in/log out system; or a Telephony system? Every day, our employees call our Telephony system at least twice a day, to log in and to log out. If they don’t log in by a given time (normally 15 minutes after their shift was to start) the system both e-mails as well as texts a message to the office. We can then proactively call both the client and a replacement aide to get the shift covered. Caregiving is a tough job, and is hard on the caregiver. That’s why Home Care agencies are in the business they are. However, not all Home Care agencies take it as seriously as other do so that’s why it’s up to you to do as much research on them prior to bringing them into your home.

In home care, assisted living and nursing care are three entirely different things, but many people confuse them and consequently might not be getting the right information that they need. To be short, in home care provides services in the home of the client, assisted living provides a secure community with limited assistance, and nursing care provides full time care in a nursing home or other permanent environment. Each type of care is quite different and may or may not be right for your family. Understanding these differences is critical in order to make an informed and responsible decision. In Home Care In home care is the type of care preferred by most people because it allows clients to keep the maximum amount of independence possible. With this level of care, a professional will come to your home and care for your senior family member. Care can be light such as simple companionship and basic help around the house, or it can be more complex and include mobility assistance, help with incontinence issues, and transportation where appropriate. In home care is flexible in the sense that it can be provided just a few days a week, full time, or on a “relief” basis for family members or other care providers. This level of care is also generally the least expensive, making it an excellent option for many people who wish to remain at home and keep their independence. Assisted Living Assisted living is a moderate level of care featuring independent or semi-independent living in a specialized community that provides some level of senior care. This means that seniors generally live in their own apartment or condominium, but are not responsible for things like lawn care or major property upkeep, etc. Within this community there are generally a number of different types of assistance available; in some cases including nursing and transportation services to medical appointments, grocery shopping, etc. Nursing Care Nursing care generally refers to full time live-in care at a dedicated facility. This is the highest level of care and can include medication management, help with mobility, incontinence care, care for severe dementia or other emotional/mental disorders, and care for the bedridden. Many people progress naturally from in home care to assisted living to nursing care as their daily assistance needs change. Because nursing care is such an intense level of care, it can be prohibitively expensive in some cases. Thankfully, most nursing care facilities accept many types of insurance, and military veterans may be eligible to receive benefits to pay for services related to any of these levels of care. However, for many people in home care is the preferred option. The independence and flexible support it allows helps families stay together, conserve resources, and relieve the burden of a primary caregiver. For an immediate consultation and to learn how in home care can benefit your family, call a professional provider now or contact one by doing a Google search for one in your area. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=1607594&ca=Home+Management

How to Select a Home Care Agency to Care For Your Family Member

Caring for seniors in their homes is becoming a very popular business; and one that is expected to grow as more and more people continue to age. But how do you find a good Home Care agency? Having owned and operated Wake County’s oldest Home Care agency, and being a certified trainer for the State of North Carolina’s DHSR, we know a little bit about what differentiates a good Home Care agency from a bad one. 1) Don’t just make sure they have insurance, ask for a copy of it! Every business owner in America can and should have a copy of a Certificate of Insurance. It details what insurance they have bought for a given period of time. Insurance a Home Care agency should carry is: Professional and General Liability, Workers Compensation, Theft or Bonding, and Hired and Non-Owned Auto. 2) How long has the agency been in business? Believe it or not, we’re still running across new things after 12 years of helping seniors. Nothing can replace experience! As an example, the longer an agency has been in business, the more established and trusted staff they have. They’ve weeded out the employees that “no call/no show” for a case, and are in a position to send out only trusted employees. 3) Does the owner of the agency give you their mobile number? Since we provide care to seniors 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days out of the year, my employees and clients may need to contact either myself or my Director of Nursing at anytime. Do they answer it? Test it a couple of times at various hours of the day, and see what happens. If you leave them a message and they don’t call you back; that’s very indicative of the type of service you’ll receive from them in the future. 4) You get what you pay for! Believe it or not, we are not getting rich charging our clients $20/hr. for services we provide. The margins in this line of work simply are not there. And we run a VERY lean agency. So, when someone says that they’ll only charge you $14 an hour versus our $20, you’re going to get what you pay for in service and in the employee they send to you. 5) Ask for referrals. We are MORE than happy to give both existing clients as well as previous clients that will vouch for both our employees that provide care as well as our commitment to customer satisfaction. The mere fact that the agency is willing to hand of references for you to call says a great deal about their agency; follow up and call those references! 6) How many clients do they have? Believe it or not, bigger is not always better. We’re a boutique agency; we only serve 30-40 clients at any one given time. Why, because it allows us to get to know each of our clients, their families, and their needs. I also know each employee that I am scheduling with the client. When it comes to Home Care, smaller really is better! 7) Who does the scheduling at the agency? While I hate to make blanket statement, I will say that “schedulers” and business owners have different priority sets. Having employed schedulers in the past, if the scheduler couldn’t find a fill in for a sick caregiver, they still received their paycheck all the same. In other words, if a scheduler couldn’t fill a shift, it was no skin off their nose. At Helping Hands of America, I do the scheduling. Raleigh is a small town, and I have a vested interest in making sure that my employees are there, day in day out. I can’t afford to have my professional or personal reputation smeared due to an employee dropping the ball. 8) Does the Home Care agency use a telephone log in/log out system; or a Telephony system? Every day, our employees call our Telephony system at least twice a day, to log in and to log out. If they don’t log in by a given time (normally 15 minutes after their shift was to start) the system both e-mails as well as texts a message to the office. We can then proactively call both the client and a replacement aide to get the shift covered. Caregiving is a tough job, and is hard on the caregiver. That’s why Home Care agencies are in the business they are. However, not all Home Care agencies take it as seriously as other do so that’s why it’s up to you to do as much research on them prior to bringing them into your home. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=840151&ca=Wellness%2C+Fitness+and+Diet

How to Select a Home Care Agency to Care For Your Family Member

Caring for seniors in their homes is becoming a very popular business; and one that is expected to grow as more and more people continue to age. But how do you find a good Home Care agency? Having owned and operated Wake County’s oldest Home Care agency, and being a certified trainer for the State of North Carolina’s DHSR, we know a little bit about what differentiates a good Home Care agency from a bad one. 1) Don’t just make sure they have insurance, ask for a copy of it! Every business owner in America can and should have a copy of a Certificate of Insurance. It details what insurance they have bought for a given period of time. Insurance a Home Care agency should carry is: Professional and General Liability, Workers Compensation, Theft or Bonding, and Hired and Non-Owned Auto. 2) How long has the agency been in business? Believe it or not, we’re still running across new things after 12 years of helping seniors. Nothing can replace experience! As an example, the longer an agency has been in business, the more established and trusted staff they have. They’ve weeded out the employees that “no call/no show” for a case, and are in a position to send out only trusted employees. 3) Does the owner of the agency give you their mobile number? Since we provide care to seniors 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days out of the year, my employees and clients may need to contact either myself or my Director of Nursing at anytime. Do they answer it? Test it a couple of times at various hours of the day, and see what happens. If you leave them a message and they don’t call you back; that’s very indicative of the type of service you’ll receive from them in the future. 4) You get what you pay for! Believe it or not, we are not getting rich charging our clients $20/hr. for services we provide. The margins in this line of work simply are not there. And we run a VERY lean agency. So, when someone says that they’ll only charge you $14 an hour versus our $20, you’re going to get what you pay for in service and in the employee they send to you. 5) Ask for referrals. We are MORE than happy to give both existing clients as well as previous clients that will vouch for both our employees that provide care as well as our commitment to customer satisfaction. The mere fact that the agency is willing to hand of references for you to call says a great deal about their agency; follow up and call those references! 6) How many clients do they have? Believe it or not, bigger is not always better. We’re a boutique agency; we only serve 30-40 clients at any one given time. Why, because it allows us to get to know each of our clients, their families, and their needs. I also know each employee that I am scheduling with the client. When it comes to Home Care, smaller really is better! 7) Who does the scheduling at the agency? While I hate to make blanket statement, I will say that “schedulers” and business owners have different priority sets. Having employed schedulers in the past, if the scheduler couldn’t find a fill in for a sick caregiver, they still received their paycheck all the same. In other words, if a scheduler couldn’t fill a shift, it was no skin off their nose. At Helping Hands of America, I do the scheduling. Raleigh is a small town, and I have a vested interest in making sure that my employees are there, day in day out. I can’t afford to have my professional or personal reputation smeared due to an employee dropping the ball. 8) Does the Home Care agency use a telephone log in/log out system; or a Telephony system? Every day, our employees call our Telephony system at least twice a day, to log in and to log out. If they don’t log in by a given time (normally 15 minutes after their shift was to start) the system both e-mails as well as texts a message to the office. We can then proactively call both the client and a replacement aide to get the shift covered. Caregiving is a tough job, and is hard on the caregiver. That’s why Home Care agencies are in the business they are. However, not all Home Care agencies take it as seriously as other do so that’s why it’s up to you to do as much research on them prior to bringing them into your home. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=840151&ca=Wellness%2C+Fitness+and+Diet

Does Canada’s Health Care System Cover Weight Loss Surgery?

In recent years, provincial governments across Canada have recognized that the increase in obesity rates is causing a financial strain on Canada’s healthcare system. A report from Statistics Canada on adult body mass index revealed that in 2008, “17.2% of Canadians aged 18 or older, roughly 4.2 million adults, reported height and weight that classified them as obese.” Now, a number of governments are realizing that weight loss surgery is a beneficial method to reducing the strain. More Canadians are now turning to weight loss surgery as an effective method to treating obesity long term. The result is more provincial governments are covering the surgery costs when patients undergo the procedure by a recognized and accredited weight loss surgery facility. Most provinces consider the surgical treatment of morbid obesity as an insured service under the publicly funded Medicare Act. Right now, Lap Band Surgery and Gastric Bypass Surgery are the only two weight loss procedures covered by insurance in Canada. As well, there are a few provinces that will only cover gastric bypass. Not every province covers the cost of lap band surgery and some provinces that do cover it will not cover the cost of the actual gastric band. As well, there are a few extended health insurance plans that may pay for part of the procedure with the other part being refunded as a tax deductible medical procedure. It is important to note that there are variations of what is covered in each province so it is important to check your home provincial health authority to find out coverage they provide. When Medicare pays for weight loss surgery, the wait time can be quite long, sometimes several years or more. It normal to have a wait period of about 5-7 years for weight loss surgery in publicly funded hospitals across Canada. The Ministry of Health and Long Term Care of Ontario (through OHIP) will pay for gastric bypass surgery for Ontario patients at specific approved private weight loss facilities. Once approved by OHIP, patients can have the surgery within about 4 to 6 weeks. Although all provincial health insurance programs cover the costs of gastric bypass surgery, it is not always available in every province. Demand for the procedure is high in the public health system, so more private accredited weight loss clinics are being chosen. Today, the obesity rates are increasing in Canada. When choosing weight loss surgery, expect to lose a lot of weight and keep it off. You will see your health and appearance drastically improve. Because of their success and minimal risks, more obese people in Canada are now choosing weight loss surgery when traditional diets and exercise programs have failed. When considering weight loss surgery it is important to discuss the benefits and risks with your physician and find out if you are a potential weight loss surgery candidate. It is also important to contact your provincial health authority and insurance provider to find out what coverage is provided if you elect to have the procedure. Adjustable gastric banding offers safe and sustainable results for weight loss surgery. The Lap band reduces the amount of food your stomach can hold and allows you to feel fuller longer. When doing research on Lap Band Surgery and the Lapband cost, consider the CIBO Weight Loss Clinic and the Lap band blog. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=590836&ca=Wellness%2C+Fitness+and+Diet

Canada – A Good Role Model For Health Care In The United States ??

Is Canada a good model for health care here in the United States? You be the judge. Even in Canada Health care costs have reached the “tipping point”. Recent research indicates the cold , hard economic reality that even in Canada with its informal subsidizes of defense costs by the good old USA is having trouble to fund its sc called all inclusive health care system that many liberal Americans beg to copy without full and thorough investigation. Up in our “Neighbor to the North” Canadians are reaching the limit of both what taxpayers can afford to pay as well as reduced access to health care and ever longer waiting times. Of course there is only so much money in the pot and other essential social services are seeing funding cuts. It is generally not appreciated that Canadians have almost had an emergency escape valve of the option of “Going South “if things get rough or too slow in their medical treatments. The humorous part according to Las Vegas based health care analyst M. Labovitch is that the people with the power and influence in Canada don’t publicize or push for changes when things are hard as they have automatically used this southern option which what they consider is both higher quality and speedier medical treatment. Indeed Labovitch notes from Vegas that the situation is so apparent and flagrant that when high profile Canadian leaders and politicians and their families have serious illnesses that need treatment the news reports always seem to be from prominent American hospitals. Canadians it seems don’t notice this two state solution or are immune and shell shocked already. To support this data a prominent Canadian think tank “The Fraser Institute” corroborated this information with a recent study. Using actual Canadian government Statistics Canada data in its current report The Fraser Institute report notes that data on the most recent five year trends that public health care spending in every one of the ten Canadian provinces continues to grow faster on average, than total revenues from all sources – including the large Canadian federal government transfers of funds from the wealthy provinces of Ontario in the industrial heartland , British Columbia (B.C.) with its mineral and forestry industries and Alberta with its oil wealth . These Canadian Federal Government fund transfers serve to transfer funds from the wealthier “Have” provinces to the less fortunate “Have Not” provinces in the hope of standardizing living standards and health care service levels across the country. Health care in Canada is taking an ever increasing share of all revenues over time, leaving proportionately less money for everything else. Public health care spending in six of the ten provinces is on pace to consume more than half of total revenues by the year 2020 , two thirds by the year 2035 and all of the provincial revenues by 2050. And even this analysis’s the Institute notes is being generous with assumptions. Projections of future revenue growth are actually overestimated because in many of the provinces recent growth revenue is a result of increasing tax burdens. Canadians pay to start with a national federal tax (G.S.T.) of 7 % in addition of provincial sales taxes which range from zero provincial sales taxes in oil rich Alberta of which the US are the main consumers to almost 11 % in Prince Edward Island. And in addition there are a myriad of hidden and incidental taxes. This is in addition as has been noted to the defense costs of Canada being subsidized by us here in the states. There is only so much money in Canadian’s pockets and they will have to make choices for a lower standard of their living personally or higher taxes. In addition Canada is currently booming with oil, mineral and lumber sales. What happens if this slows down? Is the Canadian health care system sustainable? Should it be the model for us here in the United States? You be the judge. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=92612&ca=Medical+Business

Aboriginal Health Care Canada: Helping Aborigines Have a Better Tomorrow

Aboriginal health care Canada is just one of the ways by which people are helping these special communities. For their part, the government and some other concerned agencies are turning their attention to the wellbeing of these people. Aside from the medical supplies that are regularly being sent to these people, housing projects are being implemented so that they can live comfortably in concrete and safe. Additionally, other organizations are working hand in hand in providing electricity and potable water to aboriginal areas. To further enhance this drive to help these aborigines, the government is encouraging private individuals to put up their businesses within the vicinity so these aborigines can be exposed to the modern lifestyle and for them to start on some gainful employments. And quite recently, the government made education more accessible to the natives, which led the way to the ongoing construction of school buildings inside the communities. In terms of providing access to health services, more and more medical professionals are visiting the place and within the next few years, hospitals will be built – also funded by the government. These medical efforts resulted to the discovery that these aborigines are also suffering from the same diseases that outsiders are also experiencing. Due to bad eating habits, many of these people are suffering from diabetes, heart diseases and obesity. HIV infection is also common. Aboriginal health care Canada is being made to conform to the health needs of these people. For example, big supplies of catheters are sent for those suffering from diabetes, and for those suffering from heart diseases, exercise apparatus. Despite these growing efforts, there are other areas in the aboriginal life that still remain needing much attention. These people should be exposed to technology for them to become functional in mainstream society. Technological advances in communication as well as the primacy of the internet in today’s living must be incorporated to be part of their own lives. Another area worth looking into is the productivity of their ancestral land. They have to be taught how to properly cultivate fruits and vegetables and produce meat products for their own consumption. And they must also learn which products are good for their health. It is still a long way to go but it will be good if we can start teaching these people as early as now. Education is an imperative. It is this same concern on education that was recently voiced in the United Nations. It shows that this country is not alone in trying to improve the living conditions of these people. In the same United Nations meeting, it was decided that concerned countries should send their health and education professionals right where the aborigines are located. These highly-skilled individuals will have to live with the aborigines and teach them farming, livestock raising and other skills that they need in order for them to live a respectable kind of life. On the other hand, health professionals will be sent to guide these people on how to ensure proper health care among themselves. It is expected that this effort will help improve aboriginal health care Canada. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=1563094&ca=Wellness%2C+Fitness+and+Diet

Buying Or Selling a Business in The Home Care Services Industry

The home care services industry in Canada is poised to expand greatly over the coming years due to the significant shifts in the baby boomer cohort as they age. The impact on the business for sale market will be immense. The aging population means that not only will more people get older relative to the rest of the population, they will live longer than people ever have before which means that they will require more care to function in their day-to-day activities. Because of this, many industries will develop and thrive who can best serve this segment of the community. This article will examine some of the value drivers in buying or selling a home care services business.

What is a home care services business?
A home care services business in one where the service provider offers non-medical assistance services to the clients. The clients are typically seniors who still live at home and require some assistance, but not nursing home care quite yet.

Some client services may include meal planning, companionship, driving to the grocery store, light house work, assistance with bathing or grooming, incontinence care and so on. The key point to remember is that the business focuses on non-medical care. In Ontario, Canada such services are usually seen as a top up to provincial programs such as a Community Care Access Centre (CCAC).

Caregivers
The actual caregivers are usually Personal Support Works (PSWs) and are usually contract employees and earn an hourly wage of approximately over minimum wage plus benefits. The caregivers are typically matched with a client based on a specific need. For instance, if a client needs a caregiver able to provide incontinence care then the business would work to match the need with the worker.

Scheduling
Once a business grows their customer base to a certain level, then some though to scheduling caregivers with clients needs to be given. Workers’ time must be tracked and logged. Contingencies for sick days, missed sessions and so on need to be planned for. There is usually a time tracking software package that is the heart of the business that tracks the client sessions and is tied into payroll.

Legal Issues
Before you consider embarking on either selling a home care business or buying one, you must consult with an attorney. You need to understand your obligations to your clients and also the caregivers. You need to be cognizant of recourse from any injury, accidents or mistakes. A lawyer should also draft the relevant contracts used in the business including contracts with the customers and workers.

Marketing the Business
As the business owner, you need to have a developed system of how to market to not only the end users but also the family members who are the primary people responsible for the overall care.

As with any business you buy or sell, always discuss with an accountant and lawyer before you commit to the transaction.

Steve Skrlac, MBA is a business broker serving Toronto (GTA) and the Golden Horseshoe in southern Ontario, Canada. Contact Steve to discuss selling a business in the GTA or southern Ontario, Canada.

Also, visit the official CCAC website for more information on the services offered by the CCAC and home care in Ontario, Canada.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Steven_Skrlac/369585

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Home Care System Must Be Upgraded So That Everyone Can Benefit

In-home care of seniors is rapidly becoming a way of life for many people, because it enables them to continue to live comfortably in their own homes for more years. Doctors and hospitals have noted a decrease in emergency room use by seniors who have the advantage of this type of care, a fewer number of hospitalizations, and a lower number of patients being placed into senior living facilities. For everyone involved, home care is a great innovation. Seniors get assistance with living, their children can go to work without worrying about the well-being of a parent, and costs are much lower than other types of care.

The United States isn’t the only country facing the upcoming surge of citizens who will be joining the senior population within the next decade. Canada has also already admitted that it needs to make some major repairs to their dated health care policies. Governments are rethinking their positions about such institutions as Medicare and the care it provides in order to expand for the needs of this growing senior population. These needs not only include the patients themselves, but also should involve support for loved ones and caregivers alike.

The best plan for accomplishing these tasks is to examine healthcare plans internationally searching for systems which are best encompassing the needs of their citizens and then adopting plans that incorporate some of the best facets of these programs. Many people are not yet acclimated to seeking this type of care for aging seniors. We’ve just spent too many years either trying to cope with their infirmities on our own or using expensive, long term care facilities to give us peace of mind. We aren’t yet geared to thinking of home care as an option, and this idea needs to be implanted in everyone’s mind for future reference.

The Canadian government recently investigated care options in their country, looking for the best plans available. Some of the things they found included:

1. In the Partnering for Patients program, hospital staff and care case managers work together to plan the best course for each individual’s needs.

2. A pilot program, Caregiver’s Aspirations, Realities, and Expectations (CARE), has been set up country-wide to determine the needs of caregivers.

3. The Home First program emphasizes using long-term care facilities only as a last resort. Instead the patients are released back into their own homes with care assistance and given the dignity of deciding for themselves when more formal care is needed.

Canada has also set up the organization “New Vision of Aging in Canada” (CARP) to give support and help develop future health care for seniors. The United States would do well to follow suit.

Need additional information on in home care? Get high quality, customized home care that fits your needs here: home care.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Kristie_Brown/12364

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Dealing With Reluctance to Get Home Care Assistance

Sometimes when seniors get to a point in their life, home care help would be the ideal solution to allow them more independence and a better quality of life. However, some seniors would rather be inconvenienced before they accept that they need help from others.

This article will deal with some reasons why senior citizens may push back on receiving additional care at home and some action steps that can be taken by family & friends to address these concerns.

Seniors May Feel Their Pride Is at Stake If They Accept Home Care
Sometimes an elderly person may believe that people may look at them differently if they take help. They may perceive a certain loss of pride by asking for help. As a family member of an elderly person, your role is to reinforce that home care is not a reflection of who they are. It might be helpful to point out instances where other members of the family have needed special help and how they have benefited from it. Also, try to reinforce the positive. Home care support will allow them more freedom and comfort in their own home.

There May Be a Reluctance to Let Personal Support Workers Into The Home
Some elderly people have a reluctance to change. This reluctance may also extend to allowing people to come into their house to offer them home health care services. Sometime, this reluctance may be legitimate as some people just aren’t able to get along with others. Try to mitigate this as best as you can. Perhaps you can introduce the elderly person to the personal support worker that would be working with them. Assure them that only a reputable home health agency would be used where all employees are properly screened and trained.

There is a Concern Over The Cost of Home Health Services
In the province of Ontario, Canada the Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) program is a government one that is becoming increasingly overstretched. Budgetary constraints and the resulting cuts to service have forced people to turn to private care options. Private duty care is an out of pocket expense some people may have trouble coping with. The reality, however, is that private home in-home care agencies do offer flexible packages and rates to meet most people’s budgets. Perhaps you do not require service everyday and can make due with a staggered schedule to save money. The other point to consider is that paying for in-home support services is often much more reasonable than private seniors’ residences or nursing care.

Contact Freedom Home Care to discuss senior home care in Hamilton [http://www.freedomhomecare.ca/] and the surrounding area in southern Ontario, Canada. Hamilton hospitals area another great resource for more information.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/A._Brown/376986

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Senior Assistance – Understanding Home Care

According to Statistics Canada, more than 25% of the population, amounting to millions, will be requiring some form of home care within the next 5 years. This does not include the informal assistance given by family or friends. With Elder Care requirements dramatically increasing going into the year 2016 it is important to understand all of your Senior Care options.

The goal of home care is to allow seniors to remain longer in their homes by providing medical and non-medical support services. Home Care is the critical key, which provides the senior with minor assistance regarding their daily living activities thus reducing unnecessary stress on family members. This allows seniors to put off the decision to move into an assisted care community, nursing home or other type of live-in senior care program.

Many seniors truly believe they do not have any other option but to move to an assisted living environment when the challenge to stay home has become too great for them to deal with. This is why understanding the options of what Home Care can do for you and your family is so important. Home care providers provide you and/or your family members with the security of knowing the details in your home are under control aiding in the reduction of unnecessary stress. Home care can be a medical or non-medical support service providing compassionate customized services to provide seniors with overall comfort, safety, and the dignity they deserve.

The aim in most cases is to allow seniors to live longer in their homes by providing Essential Services, which may have become difficult or burdensome to carry out. Most services are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The non-medical assisted activities of daily living can include assistance with morning routines of bathing and dressing, meal preparation, grocery shopping and pick up of medications. It can also include making appointments, accompanying to and from appointments, assisting with bill paying and dropping off mail. Sometimes it requires light housekeeping, light repairs, maintenance and yard work. More often just simply taking out the garbage is helpful. Emotional support and assistance with physical exercise can also come into play.

Home Care is best described as all medical and non medical assistance, which helps to maintain a stress free, worry free environment helping to maintain mental health for any senior. Whether living alone, with a spouse or with family members, they can assist you in providing daily services, which enhances overall quality of life. A full and complete set of services customized to meet individual demands focusing on the four major necessities of life is what most Home Care Providers offer.

Marianne, the owner and founder of Ontario Home Care Assist, works with the elderly to assist them in maintaining their independence in their own homes for as long as possible. For more Senior information and free downloads go to [http://www.OntarioHomeCareAssist.com].

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